Coalition of Indigenous Voices:
As an elected official, how would you enhance relationships with Indigenous peoples within the City of Lethbridge and with neighboring nations that border the city?

A

 

Burke

Answer

Through the Reconciliation Implementation Plan, developed jointly by the City of Lethbridge and the Lethbridge Indigenous Sharing Network, we can see exactly where we need to go on this journey to heal and respect all of our indigenous neighbours. These plans have been developed with the advice of many of our local elders and indigenous leaders as well as the dedicated efforts of the city staff and community members from a wide range of services. We would be remiss to dismiss this thorough work, which I feel needs to continue moving forward with support from Council and the city, and through education and information with our residents.

C

 

Burrows-Johnson

Answer

I would support the efforts that have been made so far that have made the City of Lethbridge the first city in Canada to approve and begin to implement a reconciliation strategy with First Nations in general and in particular, the people of the Blackfoot Confederacy. In this ongoing project I would consult with my fellow councillors and meet with Blackfoot Elders to discuss issues as they arise. I would also support work on a reconciliation monument to be placed in a significant location within the City of Lethbridge. I believe these types of monuments are important reminders of our shared values.

M

 

Campbell

Answer

Reach out. I'd love create relationships with the Sik-Ooh-Kotok Friendship centre and Opokaa'sin. I need to learn more about their culture.

J

 

Carlson

Answer

This Council has begun the process. We are working with the Lethbridge Indigenous Sharing Network and Opokaa'sin, among others in our community to better understand the needs of Indigenous Peoples within our city, and supporting their initiatives where possible. We have also begun a process of working with our Blackfoot neighbours, and have committed to continue meeting and working together. Raising the Blackfoot Confederacy and Reconciliation flags in front of City Hall was a major step forward in recognizing the challenges and opportunities ahead.

J

 

Coffman

Answer

My starting point is to continue learning about the history and experiences of the Blackfoot people, and to understand and acknowledge my role in colonization. If all Members take this path, then I would support Council identifying how we can decolonize Lethbridge, and begin taking actions towards that end. I would encourage City staff to begin seeking Indigenous knowledge for solutions to on-going challenges. With neighbouring nations, I would support creating a joint ‘social and economic action plan,’ intended to guide the social and economic exchanges between our communities. While our relationship needs dialogue, “action” is essential for justice and for our shared futures.

B

 

Crowson

Answer

I will continue to do what I’ve been doing for years: - listen and learn to the ideas of other about what is needed to build relationships - attend events and learn about Indigenous culture and history - discover and promote ways our communities can work together - continue reading and re-reading the TRC calls to action and the city’s reconciliation plan and work to ensure they are implemented within the city and city departments - help connect people and act as a liaison

C

 

Germshied

Answer

I believe the city as it is promoting itself a as a festive and artistic place should have representation at other cultures events and encourage other nations to send ambassadors to each other's events n this can help developed understanding amongst different cultures.

Z

 

Gibb

Answer

With our proximity to the largest reserve in Canada, reconciliation is especially important in our community. We are intertwined with the indigenous community in southern Alberta and Lethbridge in particular. City council needs to continue to find positive ways to work with members of our indigenous communities. Symbolic and historic events like reconciliation week are wonderful ways to improve relations with the indigenous community. We are all equal, no matter our race or background and should be treated as such.

B

 

Ginther

Answer

I would begin by holding public forums/town hall meetings where groups sit discuss and discuss how best to work together to address the relationships that appear to be shaky at best.

M

 

Heavy Head

Answer

By being elected ;)

R

 

Hoffarth

Answer

The hiring practices within City Hall should reflect a commitment to employ members of the indigenous community. Public spaces should encourage people to mix and interact in an environment that feels safe and welcoming. The City might consider employing 'ambassadors' from the indigenous community to tour public areas and to be intermediaries and engage interactions with and between our citizens. Like police that walk-a-beat, ambassadors come know people and how to handle situations and make people feel safe, welcome, and comfortable.

B

 

Hyggen

Answer

We currently consult with the Indigenous peoples by meeting with Chief and Council to ensure we are working together to meet goals of our communities while addressing Indigenous people.

L

 

Iwaskiw

Answer

See my answer to question 32

R

 

Janzen

Answer

Candidate declined to answer the question.

K

 

Layton

Answer

Candidate declined to answer the question.

S

 

MacLeod

Answer

I would continue to build relationships with Indigenous people and their leaders. It is through mutual respect and clear understanding that will help us work together on resolving complex issues. If a person leaves the Reserve to come to the City for work and does not have housing - it will not take long until problems surface. We all take our housing for granted, but we need to be respectful and considerate of those who need housing support and provide that step up housing option.

J

 

Mauro

Answer

By treating everyone equally, with respect and ensuring there is a level of trust.

D

 

Mikuliak

Answer

Be there. Make a real effort to understand, anthropologically, how Indigenous peoples and culture have arrived where they are today. Recently, there has been a tremendous emphasis on Reconciliation. This is important to all members of our general society - not just Indigenous peoples. Once again, this relates to caring to be aware. Without a context of the larger picture, it is impossible to understand who we all are and where we all are. I am committed to enhance relationships (via my role on council) by simply being willing to be there, to listen and hopefully to begin understanding positive ways to move forward with this greatly valued percentage of our population.

R

 

Miyashiro

Answer

- Continue to have the urban indigenous persons advisory group ( that was brought together for the Truth and Reconciliation work) meet regularly to help guide the City on issues involving indigenous persons. - Continue to reach out to Kainai Chief and Council and Piikani Chief and Council to discuss common issues.

R

 

Morrell

Answer

Early engagement is key to effectively and respectfully communicate with our Indigenous neighbors.  It is imperative that we listen and approach conversations with honesty and transparency  We need to be willing to learn and listen to all sides and issues that are brought forth and adapt where necessary to allow the Indigenous people to feel like their voices are being heard and their concerns are being validated. 

N

 

Paladino

Answer

Tough question. Needs a whole lot of study and open dialogue. Maybe start with a joint committee to bring recommendations to Council?

R

 

Parker

Answer

Through open dialogue and taking action through both policy and leadership.

H

 

PEREVERSEFF

Answer

Firstly we should NOT be marginalizing indigenous peoples nor should we be elevating them. They, are certainly (for the most part) an identifiable group. On their reservations, their Council makes their rules and likewise in our City we make our rules, both should be recognized and adhered to. For those residing in our City they are not to be treated any different than any other resident in our community. Like any other group, it would be preferable if they would aspire to become

J

 

Pogorzelski

Answer

I have already established relationships in the blackfoot community and will continue to do so, by visiting and supporting places such as Sik-Ooh-Kotok friendship centre, Saamis aboriginal employment and Opokaa'sin early intervention society. As a Metis person, I understand the struggles of growing up aboriginal in a land that looks at you as an outsider. My mother went to residential schools, and because of those schools she doesn't know her native tongue Michif. Residential schools still have an impact on our aboriginal youth today. It is important that we continue to support our aboriginal communities who are still feeling the effects of one of Canada's darkest chapters.

L

 

Saloff

Answer

As an Indigenous Metis Elder i have lived and worked in this community for almost 40 years. I have established a good rapport with a variety of agencies and services in this community. I have received an award by the Urban Aboriginal Board of Lethbridge for my work in the community with the Indigenous families. I was nominated for a Human Services Worker award by Opokaa'sin for my work with Aboriginal families in the community. I continue to foster new relationships with people in the Indigenous community.

J

 

Shackleford

Answer

Invite indigenous people to ALL public events put on by the city, expand reconciliation week to include elders going to elementary schools with stories and traditions, city council visiting the Blood and Pikani nation for talks on job creation, education, infrastructure, health care and the environment.

C

 

Spearman

Answer

I will continue to build and sustain positive relationships with Indigenous people within the City of Lethbridge and with neighbouring nations. Under my leadership we had a first ever council to council meeting with the Kainai council. I supported the city committee to develop a response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and attended the committee's meetings. I have encouraged support and participation by all people, organizations and entities in the city of Lethbridge. I will work together with Indigenous organizations like Sik- Ooh-Kotoki Friendship Society and others to identify opportunities to work together.

J

 

Takahashi

Answer

As above- ensuring all advisory councils have at least one FNMI rep. Upholding the TRC recommendations and working with and on the recommendations made by FNMI representative. Creating and maintaining open, honest, and equal lines of communication with FNMI representatives. And not just acknowledging that we are on Treaty 7 land but actually respecting it.

B

 

Thurber

Answer

reach out and listen and learn. Through respect, engagement and humility.

S

 

Watson

Answer

I would follow the recommendations set out by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report and by the committees established to look at this issue (such as Reconciliation Lethbridge), as well as consult with local Indigenous, Metis and Inuit Elders and groups to determine how our city can enhance its relationship with them.

D

 

Wiggers

Answer

Acknowledge that this city was founded on the traditional territory of the Blackfoot Peoples, that their culture is an integral part of Lethbridge's cultural identity and that we need to celebrate the heritage of all indigenous people. Support to an even greater extent cultural events that educate everyone on the traditions of all nations of our local indigenous populations.

R

 

Woss

Answer

We need to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land we live and work on. As a city we need to create and implement policies for Aboriginal representation, consultation & employment. Aboriginal voices should be included in policy discussions concerning health, education, housing, child services and the broad array of public services that impact urban life. I would like to see greater Aboriginal presence into our community - at public events, at presentations/ talks in schools & community events.